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U.S. Department of Health & Human Services aspe.hhs.gov Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation
Child Support Enforcement (CSE)
31 records match your search on "Child Support Enforcement (CSE)" - Showing 1 to 10
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Organization(s):
ASPE
Published:
November, 2010
Availability:
The Federal Medical Assistance Percentages and Enhanced Federal Medical Assistance Percentages are calculated pursuant to the Social Security Act (the Act). These percentages will be effective from October 1 through September 30 of the indicated year. The "Federal Medical Assistance Percentages" and "Enhanced Federal Medical Assistance Percentages" are used in determining the amount of Federal matching for State medical assistance (Medicaid) and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) expenditures, Foster Care Maintenance and Adoption Assistance payments, TANF, child care, and in other programs. Figures are given for each of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and the Northern Mariana Islands. [PDF - 3 pages]
Author(s):
Sharon McGroder, Pia Caronongan, Andrea Mraz Esposito, Subuhi Asheer, Ji-Hyeun Kwon-Min
Organization(s):
Mathematica Policy Research Inc.
Published:
October, 2012
Availability:
This report is scheduled for release in mid March. It is the final report of a project exploring evidence-based strategies for reliably identifying subgroups of low-income fathers at the outset of evaluations. The project included a scan of innovative approaches to examining subgroups that have been used in other fields, a review of theories of behavior change particularly focused on behaviors targeted by fatherhood programs, a review of relevant psychosocial indicators and measures, and a convening of federal and nonfederal experts. The project was conducted for ASPE by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.
Author(s):
Stacey McMorrow, Genevieve Kenney, Allison Cook, and Christine Coyer
Organization(s):
Urban Institute
Published:
July, 2011
Availability:
This research brief examines the private and public health insurance coverage of children eligible for child support services. The generally low-incomes and unique family structures of children in the child support system may create numerous challenges in obtaining private health insurance coverage. This brief provides estimates of the extent to which uninsured children in the child support system may be eligible for Medicaid and CHIP coverage. [22 PDF pages]
Author(s):
Erica Meade and Linda Mellgren
Organization(s):
ASPE
Published:
February, 2011
Availability:
The purpose of this document is to help Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) agencies know the full range of programs and services in the Department that currently address the needs of incarcerated individuals and their families and to understand what research and evaluation efforts are underway to identify evidence-based practices. The first section provides an overview of the relevant research on the key human services and health needs of incarcerated and reentering individuals and their families along with illustrative examples from the inventory of current HHS activities addressing these issues. The inventory portion of this document contains information on HHS activities that serve incarcerated and reentering individuals and their families. The activities include programs, demonstration projects, research, and evaluations that were funded and/or operational in FY 2009 and/or FY2010. [126 PDF pages]
Author(s):
Laura Wheaton and Elaine Sorensen
Organization(s):
Urban Institute
Published:
May, 2009
Availability:
Under current federal income tax rules, low-income noncustodial parents are ineligible for the EITC benefits available to low-income families with children, even when they support their children through full payment of child support. While the EITC and child support have successfully removed many low-income working families from poverty, the combined effect of taxes and child support payments can impoverish noncustodial parents working at or near the minimum wage. Noncustodial parent (NCP) EITC policies work to reduce this disparity. This report provides background and rationale for an NCP EITC. It examines three policy scenarios for a national NCP EITC, which are based on the NCP credits adopted by New York and Washington, D.C. and proposed in S. 1626. Estimates are provided for the number of noncustodial parents who would be eligible for an NCP EITC and for the size of the benefit and overall cost. Lastly the report identifies key design and implementation issues to be considered when enacting an NCP EITC. [22 PDF pages]
Author(s):
Committee on Ways and Means
Organization(s):
Committee on Ways and Means of the U.S. House of Representatives
Published:
June, 2008
Availability:
The Green Book is compiled by the staff of the Committee on Ways and Means of the U.S. House of Representatives from many sources and provides program descriptions and historical data on a wide variety of social and economic topics, including Social Security, employment, earnings, welfare, child support, health insurance, the elderly, families with children, poverty, and taxation. It has become a standard reference work for those interested in the direction of social policy in the United States. This web site contains links to editions available electronically.
Author(s):
Karin Malm, Erica Zielewski, and Henry Chen
Organization(s):
Urban Institute
Published:
March, 2008
Availability:
This report is a follow-up to the study What About the Dads, published by ASPE and ACF in 2006. The original study examined child welfare agencies' efforts to identify, locate, and involve nonresident fathers of children in foster care. This report, using administrative data supplied by each of the states that participated in the original study, examines case outcomes for the children whose caseworkers were previously interviewed. At the time the data were extracted for this follow-up analysis, approximately two years had passed since the original interviews, and most of the children (75%) had exited foster care. These analyses use information from the original study about whether the father had been identified and contacted by the child welfare agency and about the contacted fathers' level of involvement with their children, combined with administrative data about case outcomes two years later, to explore three research questions: (1) Is nonresident father involvement associated with case length? (2) Is nonresident father involvement associated with foster care discharge outcomes? and (3) Is nonresident father involvement associated with subsequent child maltreatment allegations?
Author(s):
Karin Martinson and Demetra Nightingale
Organization(s):
Urban Institute
Published:
February, 2008
Availability:
This brief summarizes key findings from several important fatherhood initiatives that were developed and implemented during the 1990s and early 2000s. Formal evaluations of these fatherhood efforts have been completed, some quite recently, making this an opportune time to step back and assess what has been learned and how policy makers and program managers can build on the early programs' successes and challenges. The brief highlights lessons from: the Young Unwed Fathers Project, Parents' Fair Share (PFS), Welfare-to-Work Grant (WtW) Programs, Responsible Fatherhood Programs (RFP), and Partners for Fragile Families (PFF).
Author(s):
Susan Paikin
Organization(s):
Xtria. Subcontractor: Center for the Support of Families
Published:
September, 2007
Availability:
This report summarizes the discussion at the Emerging Issues in Paternity Disestablishment Expert Symposium convened by ASPE in January 2006 as part of a project that explored how paternity disestablishment may impact child support enforcement and child welfare policies and practice, the broader social context of best interest of the child and fairness and justice, and the social and legal implications of paternity disestablishment for family law.
Author(s):
Karin Martinson, Demetra Smith Nightingale, Pamela A. Holcomb, Burt S. Barnow, and John Trutko
Organization(s):
Urban Institute with Subcontracts to Johns Hopkins University and Capital Research Corporation
Published:
September, 2007
Availability:
This report focuses on the characteristics of PFF participants and participants' employment, earnings, and child support patterns prior and subsequent to their enrollment in the program. Quarterly wage data from state unemployment compensation records were used to assess employment outcomes. State child support data on child support awards and payments were used to assess changes in participants' child support behaviors. From April 2000 through the end of 2003, nine states conducted PFF demonstrations, which were designed to help fragile families by helping fathers work with mothers in sharing the legal, financial, and emotional responsibilities of parenthood. Services were targeted at young, never-married, non-custodial parents.